Dispersed
Camping

Dispersed camping is the best way to enjoy Utah and neighboring states. It is allowed on most public lands outside of National and State Parks, mainly National Forests and BLM. It is free of charge and does not require a permit.

 

You can prepare your trip by identifying potential sites online or identifying a general area that you’ll explore during your trip.

Dispersed camping is the best way to enjoy Utah and neighboring states. It is allowed on most public lands outside of National and State Parks, mainly National Forests and BLM. It is free of charge and does not require a permit.

 

You can prepare your trip by identifying potential sites online or identifying a general area that you’ll explore during your trip.

Recommended Apps:

ONX Offroad

WHAT IT DOES:

 

OnX Offroad identifies land ownership and highlights the stretches of roads that are within National Forests so you can focus your search just along those roads. Roads on BLM are not highlighted but are also easily identifiable in the app. On this app, you can find great scenic backcountry roads and amazing dispersed camping spots.

 

HOW TO USE IT:

 

Within the Discover menu of the app, set the filter to Full-Width Roads only. We don’t allow the use of our vehicles on High-Clearance 4×4 roads.

 

Use the Hybrid view that shows you both the satellite and topographic views.

 

Navigate to the general area that you’ll be visiting.

 

Look for green highlighted roads. Green only: maintained unpaved roads. Blue-green and blue roads are off limits with our vehicles.

 

To find a camping spot along a selected road, you will zoom in and travel along that road, looking for flat areas, using the topographic lines. The larger the distance between the lines, the flatter the terrain. Dispersed camping is common so if you see vehicle tracks, pullouts, fire rings, or even parked RVs on the satellite picture, you have most probably found a good spot.

 

Mark that spot and save the waypoint. Give it a good name, assign it a relevant icon and your preferred color.

 

While you’re in the area, look for other camping spots along the same road. If the first one you had found is occupied, you’ll be quickly back on your way to your next option. If it’s high season and you’re in a popular area, it’s acceptable to ask other campers if they would share the spot. Our vehicles have a small footprint. Otherwise, just keep looking and maybe you’ll find something even better just for yourselves. It happens that roads are closed and that is more frequent in the spring, until all the snow has melted. Having backup sites available on a nearby road is also a good idea.

 

If you have the premium version of the app (recommended), you can download areas for offline use.

GOOGLE MAPS

WHAT IT DOES:

 

Google Maps is best used as a complement to OnX Offroad. It will give you navigation information and will confirm that the road you have selected is authorized for use with our vehicles. A named road is always a good indication that it is maintained, even if unpaved. A name could be as simple as NF-462, which identifies a National Forest Road. It also provides a different satellite image that you can compare to the one in OnX Offroad, for validation of your selected campsite. You can download areas for offline use, free of charge but you will not have access to the satellite view offline.

 

HOW TO USE IT:

Make sure you are logged in to Google Maps with your Google account.

 

Select the satellite view.

 

Copy the GPS coordinates of your saved locations from OnX Offroad to Google Maps.

 

Save those locations in Google Maps.

 

Download areas containing your saved locations for offline use.

 

Use the navigation function of Google Maps to get to your selected campsite.